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GINNY SIMS

Folk Beast No1: Goat

£495.00

GINNY SIMS

Folk Beast No1: Goat

£495.00

Sold out

Product Details 

A large, one-off ceramic sculpture by Ginny Sims.

Inspired by Charles Freger's seminal book Wilder Mann (see below)

Signed piece, comes in a box with maker's card

Hand made

30 x 12 cm

About

The Shop Floor Project commissioned American ceramic artist Ginny Sims to create a collection of new works inspired by Charles Freger's seminal book Wilder Mann:

"The transformation of man to beast is a central aspect of traditional pagan rituals that are centuries old and which celebrate the seasonal cycle, fertility, life and death. Each year, throughout Europe, from Scotland to Bulgaria, from Finland to Italy, from Portugal to Greece via France, Switzerland and Germany, people literally put themselves into the skin of the 'savage', in masquerades that stretch back centuries. By becoming a bear, a goat, a stag or a wild boar, a man of straw, a devil or a monster with jaws of steel, these people celebrate the cycle of life and of the seasons.

Their costumes, made of animal skins or of plants, and decorated with bones, encircled with bells, and capped with horns or antlers, amaze us with their extraordinary diversity and prodigious beauty.

Work on this project took photographer Charles Freger to eighteen European countries in search of the mythological figure of the Wild Man: Austria, Italy, Hungary, Slovenia, Slovakia, Spain, Poland, Portugal, Germany, Greece, Macedonia, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Switzerland, Croatia, Finland, Romania and the UK."

Ginny Sims explored these photographs and created a series of visceral, weighty sculptures in milky white glazes with pops of glazed colour and details. The figures, much like the original photographs, have an earthy and mysterious beauty.


Ginny Sims at work in her studio.